RBX 59

£28.50
RRP: £30.00
(3)
Stock Status: In Stock
Information
Looking forward without forgetting where you are coming from. Building without ever denying who one is.
RBX 59 is a tribute to the French department of Nord (59), where Abdul Karim Al Faransi is from, and more specifically to the city of Roubaix, of which he is particularly fond. It is a fascinating mukhallat (blend), which is neither too oriental nor too occidental. A union of woody smells and flowers softened by a musky touch that can suit ladies as well as gentlemen.

OLFACTORY DESCRIPTION

Flowers From Himalaya
Sweet Woody Notes
Patchouli
Creamy Vanilla
Oriental Amber
Indian Sandalwood
Oud From Indonesia
Musk
Reviews
Based on 3 review(s)
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Elmo - Hong Kong
This one is very friendly and well within the familiar range of Western noses - Makes me think of the alpines and collecting medicinal plants in the mountains - Not quite the projection and longevity of some of the "nuclear concoctions" of this house - Something of real individual character - And as usual really good value-for-money - Highly recommended
Robert - Canada
This is a wonderful surprise: a classic perfume in the French tradition. This is the sort of scent that one expected from the great Parisian houses sixty years ago. Unfortunately -
for a number of reasons - this style of perfumery has been degraded. Thank you, Abdul Karim, for giving us a taste of a
nearly lost art. Beautiful work!
Kevan - United States
This one needs time on the skin to shine. On first application, I was disappointed. It's obviously a quality fragrance, but this sort of sweet, French-style perfume just isn't my preference. You have flowers, vanilla, and amber, and all of them are sweet notes that can dominate a fragrance. But if you give it time, the herbs and woody notes mix in, giving it balance. I agree with the other reviews -- this is unabashedly old-fashioned. This is what men's fragrances were generations ago, and you just don't see it anymore. It's the sort of thing that made our grandmothers weak in the knees.